How to do a raft writing assignment

How to do a raft writing assignment

How to do a raft writing assignment


How to do a raft writing assignment


Character in the novel? In this lesson, students assume the role of a fruit or vegetable they’ve studied, then they write a campaign on why their fruit or vegetable should be elected “The most nutritious” in an upcoming election. A Vocabulary Fashion Show Northern Nevada Writing Project Consultant Sandy Madura shared with us this RAFT writing assignment she created for her elementary students as an review to writing friendly letters.

Write a letter to the President of the United States as yourself. Write an essay about how the school can do a better job of improving the environment as yourself. Have a class think-aloud to come up with ideas for the piece of writing that you will create as a group.

Who should the students consider as the audience for the product? The kids “missed school for the whole winter term” and Grace documented much of what she learned, where she went, and the adventures they had as they experienced the diversity of the continent. What type of format or writing style will you use?

Portions not contributed by visitors are Copyright Tangient LLC. According to these findings, management is more effective and students are more engaged in learning when differentiated instruction is used. Perhaps do this in the form of a web on the board to accommodate visual learning styles. Who will you be writing to? Thanks in advance for honoring other educators’ intellectual property. Buy DocSouth Books RAFT Assignment To complete a RAFT Assignment you are expected to write from the point of view of a historical character.

A Vocabulary Disaster by Debra Frasier. The students can also be creative in how they portray their role and address their topic. Click here to access Tracey’s on-line RAFT poetry lesson. Whom the author is writing to. Brainstorm additional topic ideas, and write down the suggestions listing roles, audiences, formats, and strong verbs associated with each topic.

Demonstrate, model, and “think aloud” another sample RAFTs exercise with the aid of the class. How teachers can asses their own instruction of RAFT assignments? What’s Your Fifth Element?

Other characters in the text? Who will be the main focus of the product? Eventually, students may choose a role, audience, format, and topic entirely on their own. Essentially, students develop more enriched learning experiences because they continually expand their current level of mastery. Her assignment is inspired by the picture book Dear Mrs. Allow student input and creativity as you craft your piece of writing. By using this printout to organize their writing, students learn to respond to writing prompts that require them to write creatively, to consider a topic from a different perspective, and to gain practice writing for different audiences.

Understand the relationship between literature and its historical, social, and cultural contexts Analyze and interpret elements of character development What is it?

Her assignment is inspired by the picture book Tough Boris by Mem Fox. They need to have put the writing in the appropriate Format so it is important that they know the difference between a story and an essay, for instance.

Assessment What are you assessing? Students are provided a list of Roles, Audiences, Formats, and Topics from which they may choose for their writing assignment. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel? As students become comfortable in responding to RAFT prompts, you can create more than one prompt for students to respond to after a reading, lesson, or unit. Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content.

Over-the-top humor is very appealing to a broad range of listeners including adults! Explain to the students that all writers must consider various elements before beginning a writing assignment. Give students another writing prompt for which you have already chosen the role, audience, format, and topic and have students react to the prompt either individually or in small groups.

What do you want to write about? Eventually, students may choose a role, audience, format, and topic entirely on their own. Click here to open the on-line assignment that Carol proposed and published during an in-service class for teachers sponsored by the Northern Nevada Writing Project.

RAFTs give students multiple opportunities to demonstrate learning, and challenge teachers to be flexible to accommodate multiple learner needs. There are many examples of RAFT assignments and ideas available online. Letters from Obedience School by Mark Teague. Have the student review the concept and assignment orally first. Tell students that they are going to structure their writing around these elements.

If students are engaged in a project that they have personally constructed and chosen, they will feel more responsibility and ownership over what they produce. After reading the poems out loud, fellow students try to guess which character the student’s poem belongs to. If students get to choose how they want to present their material, they will be more inclined to follow through on it than if it were an assigned reading or notes that were handed out during lectures.

If a student struggles with a certain concept in math, they can try and gain a new perspective by acting out the role of the concept. A figure the student wishes to emulate in the paper. See the Strategy Guide titled Using the RAFT Writing Strategy for more information and ideas pertaining to this technique. For instance, if students are reading To Kill a Mockingbird, you may have students respond to the issues in the story as various characters to different audiences in multiple formats.

What does it look like? Click here to access Sandy’s on-line RAFT lesson. Click here to open and print Pam’s one-page handout.

Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content when shared. Assessment examples Or, teachers may personalize a rubric here. Choose a few students to read their RAFT aloud. It is important that you include historically accurate details to help the reader better understand your character, write clearly, strive for creativity, and pay attention to the format.

As students become comfortable in reacting to RAFT prompts, you can create more than one prompt for students to respond to after a reading, lesson, or unit. Hold a class discussion about how students created their personal version of the assignment. Students may decide on their own topic or the teacher may provide that element in advance. It may be helpful to display the elements on chart paper or a bulletin board for future reference.

What the author is writing about. Varied prompts allow students to compare and contrast multiple perspectives, deepening their understanding of the content. He was flattened by a bulletin board bit adjusts quite well with the help of his parents to his new dimensions — all of which makes for very funny reading and travels in later books about Stanley and his family. For example, if a student has trouble remembering the function of the multiplication symbol, they can create a story where that symbol is the main character.

How Can I Adapt It? Examples Language Arts This site demonstrates using a RAFT to have students write about energy use in transportation. Use role playing as a method for explaining the different aspects of RAFT writing. Character Credo Poem Nevada high school teacher, Tracey Albee, attended our Persuasive Writing Class and proposed this poetry lesson, which she uses to help her students discover the voice of characters in novels they are studying.

Have children name two or three things they know about a RAFT that they did not previously know; one thing they have a better understanding of than before about writing in this format and one question about the RAFT format. Before having students write their own RAFT, use this printout to model how students should use this technique. As students become comfortable in reacting to RAFT prompts, give students a list of options for each component and let them choose their role, audience, format, and topic.

Diary of a Worm by Doreen Cronin , illustrated by Harry Bliss HarperCollins What icky creature looks the same from both ends? Differentiated instruction For second language learners, students of varying reading skill, students with learning disabilities, and younger learners Modify the strategy, so the student learns topic, role, format and audience separately and distinctly.

Model on a whiteboard, overhead projector, or chart paper how you would write in response to the prompt.

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